Weekly Plan – September 26th to September 30th

3rd Grade

 

This week students will continue their study of the states of the Mid-Atlantic by looking at their peoples and economies.

Monday – Mid Atlantic States – People & History

Tuesday – Mid Atlantic States – Economy

Thursday – Mid Atlantic States – Economy Project Day

There is no homework this week.

 

5th Grade

 

This week students will continue their study of the early voyages of exploration.

Tuesday – Early Voyages of Exploration – Project Day

Thursday – Early Voyages of Exploration – Project Day

Friday – No Class – Spirit Day

 

Students will have Tuesday and Thursday of this week and then Tuesday of next week to complete their projects on the early voyages and dangers of exploration.  On Friday’s class I demonstrated several key techniques including drafting the map, titles, and using larger illustrations.  Students may use up to 6 printed pictures in their work which they can research at home.  I will be putting the example I made in class up while students work on their projects together.

 

 

6th Grade

 

This week students will continue their study of despotism in England by working on their timelines on the English Civil War and Glorious Revolution.

Monday – Despotism in England – Timeline Project Day

Wednesday – Despotism in England – Timeline Project Day

Friday – No Class – Spirit Day.

The final version of the timeline will be due on Monday of next week.

TIMELINE INSTRUCTIONS/HINTS

1 – The goal of a timeline is to show a logical and clear progression or journey.  As a result, its important to create some kind of theme which will continue throughout your work in terms of your writing, titles, arrangement of writing, and images.  If you keep switching styles then it makes it difficult to follow the information.

2 – As with many organizers, the goal is to summarize larger passages of text effectively.  You may have to create short sentences but there may be other times when you can use a title to establish the theme and then single words or illustrations to add details.  It’s important to focus on what people or groups did. For example:

Question 3 – What did Charles do early in his reign to make himself unpopular?

Worksheet Text

The new king, Charles I, held very similar views to his father when it came to the power of kings. At this time England was heavily involved in the 30 Years’ War with the king requesting large amounts of money to assist his Danish allies that Parliament was unwilling to grant. Charles then dissolved Parliament and used “forced loans” to raise money threatening anyone who refused with imprisonment. The king also decided to impose martial law for extended periods of time, effectively suspending traditional English laws, and giving officials nominated by him almost unlimited power. Further money problems, and resistance to the forced loans, forced Charles to recall Parliament in March of 1628. Almost immediately the members began to debate not finances, but the rights and freedoms that they believed Charles was violating. Charles then attempted to block any speech in Parliament critical of himself or any of his ministers – something that no monarch had ever attempted before – causing outrage amongst its members.

The underlined sections are what the king did.  Not necessarily why he did these things or how people reacted to them.

3 – Using culturally appropriate styles of writing, art, and motifs can add value to your work.  Use google images to research common clothing styles of the era as well as the kinds of uniforms and weapons used during the Civil War.  You could also, for example, look at the kind of money the English used at the time rather than use modern types/symbols.

4 – When illustrating it’s important to make items clear.  Rather than doing many small illustrations, its often much more effective to do a smaller number of larger ones which can be clearer and also allow you room to write inside or around them.  If you do an image large enough it also means that you often don’t have to draw all of it.  You can also overlap large images which allows you to make a better use of the space available.

5 – Rather than drawing lines on your work, get hold of a sheet of lined paper and go over the lines in a dark pen.  If you put this sheet behind the plain piece of paper then you will be able to clearly see the lines and write much more evenly with the bonus that you won’t then have to erase any lines on the poster.

6 – Make sure that you’ve finished your work in pencil first before going on to add any kind of pen or color.  Once you put these on you can’t then go back and change anything if you discover a mistake or realize that you might need to move items to make them fit.

 

 

7th Grade

 

This week students will continue with their study of Ancient Greece by working on their projects on the development of Athenian government.

Wednesday – Athenian Society – Men, Women, and Slaves

Thursday – Athenian Society – Boys and Girls

Friday – No Class – Spirit Day

On Wednesday and Thursday students will be undertaking some short in-class projects on the different groups in Athenian society.  However, there is no homework this week.

 

8th Grade

This week students will continue their study of the rise of Fascism in Nazi Germany.

Monday – The Nazi Party in Power – Essay Preparation Day

Tuesday – The Nazi Party in Power – Essay Preparation Day

Wednesday – The Nazi Party in Power – Essay Writing Day

 

This week we will continue work on the following essay question:

In what ways did the Nazis attempt to create their version of an orderly people’s community in Germany between 1933 and 1945?

Students will have time in class on Tuesday and Wednesday to start typing the essay with the final version due by 8PM on the following Monday.  Below are the instructions/hints posted last week:

 

In this essay the key is for students to focus on the major themes of government, the economy & workers, youth, women, culture, and minorities.  Students will be given some reading sheets on each topic which they will then have to review independently, placing the information they find into an organizer/matrix which I will introduce to them in class.  Here are a few hints on planning/writing:

 

1 – As with many essays this year, the key to writing is to find common themes between topics rather than simply write about each topic in turn.  In this case consider how the words inclusion and exclusionmight apply to Nazi policies in each area.

2 – There is a fine balance to be found between using too many examples and not enough.  In the essays on the New Deal some students went a bit too far in mentioning every single kind of project which groups like the WPA and CCC worked on.  At the same time, other students managed to not mention these groups or their work at all – only stating that programs were started to give people jobs.

3 – Introductions really need to focus on the topic of the question.  In this case you’re writing about the Nazi Party in power and how they implemented Fascist ideas in Germany.  You should probably briefly mention the reasons for their rise but there would be no need to mention, in detail, things like hyperinflation or the political instability of the Weimar Republic during the 1920s and early 1930s.

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7th Grade – Timelines Update

Due to scheduling changes I will not be having the 7th grade on Wednesday.  Because of this the timeline will be due at the end of class on Friday rather than the beginning to give students extra time.

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Student Work – Ancient Greece Maps & Vocab Sheets

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7th Grade – Athenian Government – Timeline Motifs

Here are just a few examples of the kinds of motifs which students might want to use in their projects on the development of Athenian government.

To find these and other examples go to google image search and type in the following terms:

Greek Motifs

Ancient Greece Motifs

Ancient Greece Icons

Ancient Greece Page Border

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Weekly Plan – September 19th to September 23rd

3rd Grade

This week students will commence their study of the states of the Mid-Atlantic

Monday – Mid Atlantic States – Geography

Tuesday – Mid Atlantic States – Map Project Day

Thursday – Mid Atlantic States – State Map Project

There is no homework this week.

 

5th Grade

This week students will continue their study of the early voyages of exploration.

Tuesday – Early Explorers – Voyages of Exploration

Thursday – Dangers of Exploration

Friday – Early Explorers & Dangers of Exploration – Project Day

 

On Friday, students will begin work on another paired project on the early voyages of exploration and the different dangers which sailors faced.  Students may wish to research images on these online.  I also have an image sheet available on this website.

 

 

6th Grade

 

This week students will conclude their study of the rise and impact of Enlightened Despotism in France and then look at attempts to introduce the same system to England.

Monday – Despotism in France – Essay Writing Day

Wednesday – Despotism in England – Part 1

Friday – Despotism in England – Part 2

On Monday students will write their answer to the following question:

“In what ways did French rulers succeed in creating a system of Enlightened Despotism in France between the late 1500s and early 1700s?”

As a quick reminder I am looking for students to do the following things in their writing:

1 – Introductions : Introductions should “set the scene” by introducing the topic in the context of the time in which it took place.  This can often be done by making reference to what was/what happened in the time immediately before.  In this case students need to express/show the general structure (or the lack of) governments during the period of the Middle Ages.

2 – Body Paragraphs : These should focus on how French rulers addressed each of the 5 goals of enlightened despotism and attempt to make some links between them e.g. Why the increased collection of taxes as important for the achievement of other goals.

3 – Conclusion : Students should not simply summarize what they have already written.  The conclusion should attempt to summarize the impact that enlightened despotism had on France.  Students will be given some additional facts/statistics to assist them in this once we start planning.

 

7th Grade

 

This week students will continue with their study of Ancient Greece by working on their projects on the development of Athenian government.

Wednesday – Athenian Government – Project Day

Thursday – Athenian Government – Project Day

Friday – Athenian Society

Students will have several days to work on their projects in class with the final version due on Friday at the beginning of class.  I’ve written a few hints for completing timelines below.  We will also have gone over these in class on Friday of last week.

 

TIMELINE INSTRUCTIONS/HINTS

1 – The goal of a timeline is to show a logical and clear progression or journey.  As a result, its important to create some kind of theme which will continue throughout your work in terms of your writing, titles, arrangement of writing, and images.  If you keep switching styles then it makes it difficult to follow the information.

2 – As with many organizers, the goal is to summarize larger passages of text effectively.  You may have to create short sentences but there may be other times when you can use a title to establish the theme and then single words or illustrations to add details.

3 – Using culturally appropriate styles of writing, art, and motifs can add value to your work.  Look at how the ancient Athenians dressed, their buildings, as well as how they did things like voting or other activities.  If, for example, you’re illustrating the role of the Strategoi and draw a gun then it’s going to look a little out of place.

4 – When illustrating it’s important to make items clear.  Rather than doing many small illustrations, its often much more effective to do a smaller number of larger ones which can be clearer and also allow you room to write inside or around them.  If you do an image large enough it also means that you often don’t have to draw all of it.  You can also overlap large images which allows you to make a better use of the space available.

5 – Rather than drawing lines on your work, get hold of a sheet of lined paper and go over the lines in a dark pen.  If you put this sheet behind the plain piece of paper then you will be able to clearly see the lines and write much more evenly with the bonus that you won’t then have to erase any lines on the poster.

6 – Make sure that you’ve finished your work in pencil first before going on to add any kind of pen or color.  Once you put these on you can’t then go back and change anything if you discover a mistake or realize that you might need to move items to make them fit.

 

 

8th Grade

This week students will commence their study of WW2 by looking at the rise of Fascism in Nazi Germany.

Monday – Elements of Fascism & Post-War Germany.

Tuesday – The Rise of the Nazi Party

Wednesday – The Nazi Party in Power – Essay Instruction Day

 

On Wednesday we will begin work on the following essay question:

In what ways did the Nazis attempt to create their version of an orderly people’s community in Germany between 1933 and 1945?

This is an essay which students will complete out of class but they will be given time at the end of the week and next week to work on it during class time.  In this essay the key is for students to focus on the major themes of government, the economy & workers, youth, women, culture, and minorities.  Students will be given some reading sheets on each topic which they will then have to review independently, placing the information they find into an organizer/matrix which I will introduce to them in class.  Here are a few hints on planning/writing:

 

1 – As with many essays this year, the key to writing is to find common themes between topics rather than simply write about each topic in turn.  In this case consider how the words inclusion and exclusion might apply to Nazi policies in each area.

2 – There is a fine balance to be found between using too many examples and not enough.  In the essays on the New Deal some students went a bit too far in mentioning every single kind of project which groups like the WPA and CCC worked on.  At the same time, other students managed to not mention these groups or their work at all – only stating that programs were started to give people jobs.

3 – Introductions really need to focus on the topic of the question.  In this case you’re writing about the Nazi Party in power and how they implemented Fascist ideas in Germany.  You should probably briefly mention the reasons for their rise but there would be no need to mention, in detail, things like hyperinflation or the political instability of the Weimar Republic during the 1920s and early 1930s.

 

 

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Student Work – August

Here are a few examples of exceptional student work from the first few weeks of school.

3rd Grade – New England Maps

 

5th Grade – New Sailing Technologies

 

6th Grade – Forms of Government

 

7th Grade – Development of Religion & Impact of Geography

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Weekly Plan – September 12th to September 16th

3rd Grade

This week students will conclude their study of the different regions of the  New England region by learning how to use their worksheets and new strategies to complete a crossword project on the region.

Monday – Crossword & Research Strategies

Tuesday – The New England States – Crossword Day

Thursday – The New England States – Project Day

There is no homework this week.

 

5th Grade

This week students will conclude their project on the adventures and life of Marco Polo and then commence their study of the early voyages of exploration.

Tuesday – Marco Polo – Project Day

Thursday – Marco Polo – Project Day

Friday – Early Explorers – Voyages of Exploration

There are a few special limitations/instructions for the projects that students should bear in mind as they work in class and at home.

1 – The word limit for the poster is 150 words.  Students will need to be creative in how they describe/show what happened to Marco Polo on his journey.  However it may be useful to remember the following things:

  • There will be a lot of information on your map that does not need to be repeated elsewhere.
  • Dashes ( – ) do no count as words.
  • You do not keep needing to repeat Marco Polo.
  • Ask yourself if you need words or can use an image instead.
  • There is nothing wrong with using single words to describe an event or things (Pirates!) (Storms!)

2 – Make sure to have all your summaries written out on your rough draft before putting them on your poster.  Having a ruler/bold lined piece of paper will save you a huge amount of time next week.

 

6th Grade

 

This week students will conclude their study of the rise and impact of Enlightened Despotism in France.

Monday – Despotism in France – Essay Planning & Writing Strategies

Wednesday – Essay Writing Day

Friday – Essay Writing Day

Students will spend the week writing and revising a short essay response on the following question:

 

“In what ways did French rulers succeed in creating a system of Enlightened Despotism in France between the late 1500s and early 1700s?”

We will be spending a few extra days the subsequent week working on writing strategies and the essay itself.  At this stage I am looking for students to show the following things in their writing:

1 – Introductions : Introductions should “set the scene” by introducing the topic in the context of the time in which it took place.  This can often be done by making reference to what was/what happened in the time immediately before.  In this case students need to express/show the general structure (or the lack of) governments during the period of the Middle Ages.

2 – Body Paragraphs : These should focus on how French rulers addressed each of the 5 goals of enlightened despotism and attempt to make some links between them e.g. Why the increased collection of taxes as important for the achievement of other goals.

3 – Conclusion : Students should not simply summarize what they have already written.  The conclusion should attempt to summarize the impact that enlightened despotism had on France.  Students will be given some additional facts/statistics to assist them in this once we start planning.

 

7th Grade

 

This week students will continue with their study of Ancient and World history by looking at the civilization and peoples of Ancient Greece.

Wednesday – Minoans & Mycenaeans – Project Day

Thursday – Athenian Government

Friday – Athenian Government – Project Day

Students should remember to have their maps and vocab sheets completed by Wednesday.  A quick reminder of the requirements which were posted last week is below.  On Thursday we will being our study of the rise of Athenian democracy after which students will commence work on a timeline project which will carry on into next week.

MAP REQUIREMENTS

1 – Students clearly label the areas/regions/features requested in the instructions.

2 – Written summaries are brief and to the point and illustrated appropriately.

Additional marks may be earned by doing the following:

1 – Shading in areas of land depending on their topography (flat, mountains etc) and providing a key.  Students however should be careful to not obscure their labels.  Areas of water can also be shaded in but with care to not go over onto areas of land.

2 – Working out the map scale and providing a key showing the distance.  To figure this out find out, for example, the distance between two points on the map.  You can then use this to work out how far, for example, 100 miles would be.

3 – Using culturally appropriate styles of writing, art, and motifs.  For example, if asked to show the animals which the ancient Greeks relied on looking at how the Greeks themselves showed them in their art. If asked to show how the Greeks used the sea using accurate examples of Greek ships.

4 – Drawing a small picture of Poseidon, father of Michael Phelps, in the sea.

 

8th Grade

 

This week students will conclude their study of the Great Depression & New Deal by writing their essay on the topic.  On Monday and Tuesday we will look into using statistics and some more basic essay strategies and skills with the final writing to be done on Wednesday.  Students will be allowed to use a planning sheet in class during the writing but they should remember that they only have limited time (see instructions below)

Monday – No Class – Testing.

Tuesday – The First New Deal

Wednesday – The Second New Deal

 

Students should continue to prepare for the upcoming in-class essay (with limited time) based on the following question:

In what ways did Roosevelt’s New Deal programs attempt to deal with the causes, events, and consequences of the Great Depression?

 

Students have already begun writing a brief plan which, so far, has dealt with the Great Depression half of the essay.  On Wednesday they will receive some additional instructions to begin work on the part of the plan dealing with the proposed solutions.  When preparing for the essay students should bear in mind that:

1 – They only have a limited time.  If they try to address every single cause/consequence/event/solution in detail then they will run out of time and space.  It is sufficient, in most cases, to address items using just a few sentences.  Similar programs can be grouped together rather than each addressed in turn e.g. the CWA, CCC, NYA etc etc.

2 – The introduction should be used to “set the scene”.  In this case it would make most sense to briefly discuss the following:

  • The boom of the 1920s
  • The sudden crash of 1929
  • Some of the immediate consequences of that crash (not the causes)
  • The election of Roosevelt as President

3 – The plan is for students to see how the New Deal included both short term and long term programs.  This means two basic body paragraphs.  The key is to understand that one (short term) was really designed to deal with the consequences while the other (long term) with the causes.

4 – Students should attempt to tie their body paragraphs together by writing a linking sentence at the start of the second paragraph which makes some reference to the previous one.  I am not going to provide a direct example for this topic but an example from the previous essay would be:

  • 1st Body Paragraph – A discussion on the increased freedoms enjoyed by women
  • 2nd Body Paragraph – A discussion on the restrictions placed on African-Americans

The linking sentence could read something like:

  • The increased freedoms enjoyed by women during the 1920s contrasted greatly with the lives of the vast majority of African-Americans.

5 – The conclusion will deal with the efficacy/impact of these New Deal programs.  Students will be given a sheet with some additional statistics the week after next and we will begin to see how these can be incorporated into a title.

 

For this essay students will be allowed to bring a detailed plan into the class with them along with any facts/figures/dates they may need.  If all goes to plan then they should be writing it on Wednesday the 14th.

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7th Grade – Usborne Book of the Ancient World

Amazon Link

61ANSZYMRAL

A very useful book for the first couple of 7th grade units on Ancient Greece and Rome.  Brimming with information and illustrations which students can use in their different homework assignments.

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8th Grade – Last Call – The rise and fall of Prohibition

A well written narrative of the prohibition era at a very good price on amazon.

A brilliant, authoritative, and fascinating history of America’s most puzzling era, the years 1920 to 1933, when the US Constitution was amended to restrict one of America’s favorite pastimes: drinking alcoholic beverages.

From its start, America has been awash in drink. The sailing vessel that brought John Winthrop to the shores of the New World in 1630 carried more beer than water. By the 1820s, liquor flowed so plentifully it was cheaper than tea. That Americans would ever agree to relinquish their booze was as improbable as it was astonishing.

Yet we did, and Last Call is Daniel Okrent’s dazzling explanation of why we did it, what life under Prohibition was like, and how such an unprecedented degree of government interference in the private lives of Americans changed the country forever.

Writing with both wit and historical acuity, Okrent reveals how Prohibition marked a confluence of diverse forces: the growing political power of the women’s suffrage movement, which allied itself with the antiliquor campaign; the fear of small-town, native-stock Protestants that they were losing control of their country to the immigrants of the large cities; the anti-German sentiment stoked by World War I; and a variety of other unlikely factors, ranging from the rise of the automobile to the advent of the income tax.

Through it all, Americans kept drinking, going to remarkably creative lengths to smuggle, sell, conceal, and convivially (and sometimes fatally) imbibe their favorite intoxicants. Last Call is peopled with vivid characters of an astonishing variety: Susan B. Anthony and Billy Sunday, William Jennings Bryan and bootlegger Sam Bronfman, Pierre S. du Pont and H. L. Mencken, Meyer Lansky and the incredible—if long-forgotten—federal official Mabel Walker Willebrandt, who throughout the twenties was the most powerful woman in the country. (Perhaps most surprising of all is Okrent’s account of Joseph P. Kennedy’s legendary, and long-misunderstood, role in the liquor business.)

It’s a book rich with stories from nearly all parts of the country. Okrent’s narrative runs through smoky Manhattan speakeasies, where relations between the sexes were changed forever; California vineyards busily producing “sacramental” wine; New England fishing communities that gave up fishing for the more lucrative rum-running business; and in Washington, the halls of Congress itself, where politicians who had voted for Prohibition drank openly and without apology.

Last Call is capacious, meticulous, and thrillingly told. It stands as the most complete history of Prohibition ever written and confirms Daniel Okrent’s rank as a major American writer.

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Ancient Greece – Map Sheets

If students need another copy of the map sheets click on the images below and then print them.  I’ve also included a larger double sheet if your student needs more space.

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